Coalition for Racial Equality & Rights

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12599
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The closing date for application to join the cast for the Glasgow 2014 Ceremonies is at 5.00pm this Friday 14th Feb 2014, so on behalf of our friends at Glasgow 2014 we're happy to remind our blog readers of this once in a lifetime opportunity.

So see below for your chance to join the cast of the Opening and Closing Ceremonies of the Glasgow 2014 XX Commonwealth Games. This is your chance to play a part in one of the biggest parties Glasgow has ever seen. 

No previous experience or specific skills are required – you simply need to have enthusiasm and commitment – its going to be an amazing experience! 

Ceremonies Volunteer Cast Performer: Key Information 

This guide is designed to provide you with key information on how to assist applicants through the online application form.

To apply for this once in a lifetime opportunity just click here https://ceremonies.glasgow2014.com 

Eligibility Criteria 

There are some basic eligibility requirements applicants will need to meet in order to apply for a chance to be a Ceremonies Volunteer Cast Performer. We recommend applicants read the eligibility requirements as listed below before they start their application: 

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Tagged in: Commonwealth Games
17299

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Monday 27th January 2014 marked Holocaust Memorial Day when we remember the victims of the Holocaust and of genocides in Rwanda, Bosnia, Cambodia and Darfur.

“The Holocaust was the murder by Nazi Germany of six million Jews. While the Nazi persecution of the Jews began in 1933, the mass murder was committed during World War II. It took the Germans and their accomplices four and a half years to murder six million Jews. They were at their most efficient from April to November 1942 – 250 days in which they murdered some two and a half million Jews. They never showed any restraint, they slowed down only when they began to run out of Jews to kill, and they only stopped when the Allies defeated them."

"There was no escape. The murderers were not content with destroying the communities; they also traced each hidden Jew and hunted down each fugitive. The crime of being a Jew was so great, that every single one had to be put to death – the men, the women, the children; the committed, the disinterested, the apostates; the healthy and creative, the sickly and the lazy – all were meant to suffer and die, with no reprieve, no hope, no possible amnesty, nor chance for alleviation."

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16791

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Hi All,

I write a lot of multi-cultural human rights pieces.  I would like to tell you something about my recent Gig with CV2 at the Centre for Contemporary Arts in Glasgow. I also enclose a piece about the Gig that we gave out on the night. It was a multi-voice show but that still means that about half of the pieces were not multi-voice (I like a mix of pieces). One week before the Gig, one of the actors pulled out and we had to re-rehearse everything at the last minute. The actors who did perform (names below) did so without Funding. They performed for the love of the form. And I am very grateful to them!

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Tagged in: Guest Blog
19147

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The Coalition for Racial Equality and Rights (CRER) launched Black History Month 2013 in style on Wednesday 25th September at the Street Level Photoworks, Trongate 103 in Glasgow.

The launch was opened by the Lord Provost of Glasgow City Council, Councillor Sadie Docherty, and the Minister for Commonwealth Games and Sports, Shona Robison MSP. Both welcomed October's month long celebration of the contributions and lives of black and minority ethnic communities in Glasgow and Scotland’s heritage.

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Tagged in: Black History CRER
24260

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The final report of the Public Sector Equality Duty Review has arrived, two months late and yet somehow still far too early.

Unsurprisingly, one of the main thrusts of the PSED review report is that it’s not possible to accurately review the public sector equality duties because of the short space of time since their introduction. This concession will be cold comfort to the many people who raised the inappropriate time scale when the review was first proposed; particularly as it hasn’t stopped the Independent Steering Group from deciding that there is much to criticize and almost nothing to commend in the operation of the duties so far.

The tone of the report is overwhelmingly negative from the foreword onwards. The first description of the Steering Group’s feelings about the review is a single sentence from Chairperson Rob Hayward OBE, set in a paragraph all of its own (presumably for emphasis), stating “My colleagues and I were disappointed by some of what we found.” Whilst discussion of best practice is noticeably absent, the report often veers towards scaremongering. For example, it alleges that emergency services are less effective thanks to the paperwork associated with PSED (seriously), that citizens should not have to bear the ‘burden’ of filling in equality monitoring forms and that private businesses undertake days and days of unnecessary administration as a result of the duties.

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16261

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As we mark the 60th Anniversary of the European Convention on Human Rights coming in to force, CRER believes it is time to stand up and remind people of the facts behind the Convention, how we all benefit from the rights that it protects and why we should oppose any attempts to undermine the Convention.

The European Convention on Human Rights was the first Council of Europe’s convention aiming at protecting human rights. Its ratification is a prerequisite for joining the Council of Europe.  It was adopted in 4 November 1950 and entered into force on September 3rd 1953. The United Kingdom was among the first states to ratify the ECHR and played a pivotal role in its creation. The UK accepted the right of individuals to take a case to Strasbourg and the jurisdiction of the European Court of Human Rights in 1966. 

The Convention guarantees a range of political rights and freedoms of the individual against interference by the State. Before the incorporation of the Convention, individuals in the United Kingdom could only complain of unlawful interference with their Convention rights by lodging a petition with the European Commission of Human Rights in Strasbourg. That all changed on 2 October 2000 when the Human Rights Act 1998 (HRA)came into force, allowing UK citizens to sue public bodies for breaches of their Convention rights in domestic courts. 

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13798

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Following a legal challenge brought forward by solicitors, Deighton Pierce Glynn, on behalf of two clients of the Refugee and Migrant Forum of East London the Westminister Government has 'confirmed that if any further campaigns of a similar nature are planned, they would carry out a consultation with local authorities and community groups.'

The legal challenge against the 'Go Home' vans pilot was brought on the basis that the initiative failed to comply with the public sector equality duty of the Equality Act which requires public bodies to have due regard to the need to eliminate discrimination and harassment and to foster good relations between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not.

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14542

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The European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) Annual Report has set out a stark picture of the challenges faced by Black and minority ethnic communities in Europe.

Its review of racism and ethnic discrimination finds that crimes motivated by racism, xenophobia and related intolerances, the mainstreaming of elements of extremist ideology in political and public discourse and ethnic discrimination in healthcare, education, employment and housing persist throughout the European Union (EU). Roma populations in particular continue to face discrimination, as evidence collected by FRA and other bodies demonstrates. EU Member States made efforts to develop comprehensive approaches to Roma integration. Nevertheless, more still needs to be done when it comes to securing sufficient funding for Roma inclusion and ensuring that it benefits targeted groups, putting robust and effective monitoring mechanisms in place, and fighting discrimination and segregation, the European Commission concluded in its assessment of National Roma Integration Strategies.

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16030

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On Wednesday, we shared a report on Twitter that UKBA Officers were stopping people of minority ethnic appearance at the tube station in Kensal Green. Tweeters and some independent media quickly took up the story, with a few of the bigger news outlets (notably the Huffington Post and New Statesman) catching on this morning. But what actually happened at Kensal Green, and was it legal?

According to the Home Office statement made to Political Scrapbook, this was merely “a routine operation” where Officers “questioned individuals to check if they had the right to be in the UK”.

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17167
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On 17 May 2012, the Daily Mail hailed the fact that 100,000 calls had been made reporting ‘illegal’ immigrants (one call every 6 minutes) to the UK’s National Allegations Database, despite the system not being publicly launched until 30 September 2012. Conveniently forgotten has been the fact that less than 3% of allegations led to arrest.

These Government campaigns urging citizens to report neighbours and work colleagues as illegal immigrants and the latest campaign to “go home or be arrested” are coming very close to two campaigns run by Europe’s right wing parties.

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12407

In the last week we have seen anti-racist organisations in Scotland voice concern over the decision by Crimestoppers to use the image of a Black man, hand cuffed and pinned to the ground, to highlight its work in tackling drug dealers with stories appearing in the Herald, Scotsman and Independent.

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Organisations have rightly been quick to point out that members of the black and minority ethnic communities are far more likely to be the victims of crime in Scotland than perpetrators.

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13109

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In the past few months the world has witnessed several high profile incidents which have resulted in increased discrimination against persons from Asian backgrounds. Such incidents have included the bombing of the Boston Marathon, the trial and conviction of an Oxford sex-grooming ring, and most recently the murder of Drummer Lee Rigby. With each of these events has come a media flurry that has overwhelmingly focused on the Muslim community, and through this one-sided coverage there has been a growing tension; leaving some people from black and minority ethnic (BME) backgrounds, particularly those from the Muslim community, feeling vulnerable and under attack once more.

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14204



The 5th of July 2013 marks the 65th anniversary of the NHS. This is a momentous occasion. It gives the UK a chance to take pride in the knowledge our country has one of the most successful health care systems in the world. The NHS philosophy is one based on equality, in that every person resident in the UK receive equal treatment as they require. If you break your leg, you know where to get an x-ray. If your loved one is diagnosed with cancer, it would be fair for you to assume that they will be given exemplary care. Despite this however, there are continuing difficulties for BME people in accessing health services. (For further information on this issue you can see Chapter 9 of the EHRC’s publication ‘How Fair Is Britain?’ available here). But, what about those employed by the health service, the faces behind the NHS?

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Tagged in: Equalities NHS Racism
18458

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"The Movement today for freedom cannot be pushed back anymore than a tidal wave can be pushed back by hand. That which seeks to destroy the freedom of Man, seeks to destroy the soul of Man."


Medgar Evers, May 31, 1959

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18885

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Local community issues are a hot topic here at CRER in the run up to our event Putting U back into CommUnity’ on 20th June 2013 at 6pm in the Scottish Youth Theatre. We asked Policy Officers Jenn and Sagarika to share their perspectives on community, environment and involvement.

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24676

Demonstrators outside the House of Commons. Image via International Dalit Solidarity Network When I first heard about caste based discrimination faced by people in Britain, I was appalled; I thought it would be one of those things people would prefer not to carry with them. Caste is an oppressive system of social stratification based upon occupation and the basis of one’s birth. In South Asia, the traditional caste system rooted in the Hindu religion begins with Brahmins (priests, academics) at the top, and continues downwards to Kshatriyas (warriors), Vaisyas (business community, minor officials) and then Sudras (unskilled workers). Beneath this hierarchy are those considered untouchables or Dalits who perform menial services. Caste systems are also found in Africa, other parts of Asia and the Middle East.

So how prevalent is caste discrimination in 21st century Britain? A study by the Anti-Caste Discrimination Alliance (ACDA) in 2009 showed that 58% of survey responses confirmed they had been discriminated against because of their caste. There have been cases of name calling ‘chamar’ or ‘churra’, names as derogatory as calling a black person a ‘n*****’, or calling people from Indo-Pakistan a ‘Paki’. There have been cases in Britain such as those of a carer refusing to bathe an ailing patient because the patient was from a lower caste and a case of a couple who were dismissed from work on the grounds that they were married but were not of the same caste.

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20332

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Aside from the few cases of race discrimination which hit the headlines, we don’t hear much about how Britain’s equality laws are upheld. To the casual observer, this probably seems quite natural. The Employment Tribunal system is so far removed from our everyday lives that we barely perceive it, assuming that it simply toils away in the background, resolving other people’s discrimination problems ten a penny.

But what happens when someone needs to use its services – say, for a race discrimination claim?

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25584
Shelia Washington, who was instrumental in organizing the Scottsboro Boys Museum.
Justice at last for the Scottsboro Boys

After over 80 years, a gross injustice has at last been righted in the U.S. 







It was an intriguing old photo from a Glasgow newspaper that had belonged to my Dad that led me to find out about the tragic tale of the Scottsboro Boys.  The old Press photo showed a black woman heading up some kind of demonstration in the 1930s, the time of the Depression.  Her prominence was unusual at the time on the double count of her gender and her colour.  

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23880

The Coalition for Racial Equality and Rights welcome the news that the Council of Europe has launched a campaign against the growing problem of hate speech online.

The No Hate Speech Movement will aim to tackle all forms of racism and discrimination on the internet by helping young people and youth organisations to recognise and act against this latest form of human rights violation. The rise in the use of hate speech – in social media, forums, chat rooms and elsewhere online – has prompted some commentators to label the digital phenomenon as a new form of human rights abuse. 

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25051

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British antipathy towards immigration is not a new thing. It is often linked with painting a picture of immigrants as benefit scroungers, burdening the British welfare state and stealing the UK-nationals’ jobs without giving anything back to the system. Some immigrant populations have even been criticised for working too hard. Yes, you read that correctly. Amidst the contradictions listed above, a new wave of anti-immigration recently surfaced with even Prime Minister David Cameron speaking out against apparent masses of tax-dodging illegal immigrants in his 25 March Immigration speech, stating that in the UK, “You put into Britain- you don’t just take out.” But who exactly is doing all this putting in and taking out?

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